Got tech? Hear me roar!

It’s been a week or two of interesting stories related to school students harnessing social networks in order to make a point. We’ve had school speeches on the state of education and a plea for puffer jackets to name the most recent two. There has been reciprocal handwringing on the part of the press in response that has […]

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The death of the digital community?

This post is my contributing chapter for the special Connected Educator Month project #edbooknz – an e-book launched by Sonja Van Schaijik. Many thanks to Rachel Roberts for her ‘warm yet challenging’ feedback:)  “My seven year old daughter knows that her father congregates with a family of invisible friends who seem to gather in his […]

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Creative Commons in schools

“Universal access to research, education and participation in culture” – Creative Commons Aotearoa goal. I recently attended one of the sessions being held around the country by Creative Commons Aotearoa, featuring guest presenters included Matt McGregor, Keitha Booth, Andrew Matangi, Ian Munro and Stephen Lethbridge. Together, they offered a quick-fire overview of the issues, challenges and […]

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The knowledge is in the network

[Here’s an article recently published and cross-posted here from the Education Review, Leadership & PD July 2013. This article has also appeared in the Education Gazette.] Atarangi is a teacher working in a large secondary school in the North Island. She is passionate about ensuring her students engage with her English lessons in ways that […]

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The myth of the average

“What good is the best technology in the world if you can’t reach the instruments when you need them the most?” – Todd Rose, Harvard A thought provoking TEDx talk from Todd Rose. Designing cockpits for the mythical ‘average pilot’ presents an interesting metaphor for how schools sometimes think about designing learning for students and teachers. […]

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